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It’s Baaaaack. After a 30 year hiatus Artificial Intelligence is on the move.

I just read an interesting article, ‘The Return of Artificial Intelligence’. Written by Bloomberg News, it appears that the sleeping giant, Artificial Intelligence is now awake and on a roll. Most are start-ups, and according to the article, funding is there for the asking, without even a business plan.

So, what are these entrepreneurs developing? The current trend seems to focus on developing business tools that solve specific organizational challenges. Behind the resurgence, is companies like Amazon, Google, Apple, and Microsoft who have over the past decade deployed AI technologies, such as which ad is more likely to be clicked on. Other examples include Apple’s chirpy assistant, Siri, and Google’s self driving cars.

What I find interesting, is this focus on solving business problems. According to the article, “the University of California at San Francisco began working with Palo Alto, California-based MetaMind on two projects: one to spot prostate cancer and the other to predict what may happen to a patient after reaching a hospital’s intensive care unit so that staff can more quickly tailor their approach to the person. Theresa O’Brien, an associate chancellor at UCSF, said the university teamed up with the startup—the first such collaboration she’s aware of—because it wants to develop better approaches to bespoke medical treatment by employing computers to sort and link data, which AI can help.”

American Express uses AI to automatically detect fraudulent transactions. ““Our machine learning models help protect $1 trillion in charge volume every year, making the decision in less than 2 milliseconds,” Vernon Marshall, American Express’s functional risk officer, wrote in an e-mail, without disclosing which AI companies it works with. “We have been delighted with how well this technology can detect fraud.”

All in all, it will be curious to watch as AI developments unfold.

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I thought we were over this? Information Governance is NOT that hard to understand.

Many of my colleagues send me information that I would be interested in, which is great. I just happened to read a blog, by Gordy Hoke, who jotted down his notes from attending LegalTech, sponsored by ALM Events, Mr. Hoke made some very interesting comments on Information Governance (IG) that he gleened from the exhibitors.

Although humorous, I found it very surprising that vendors in the legal arena still don’t understand IG. According to Mr. Hoke, who attended the New York City LegalTech Feb. 3-6, “Information Governance (IG) could be seen as an incidental tag line or a rising star. I say “incidental tag line” because many exhibitors added IG to their signage in a list of bulleted items. It was as if they wanted to be sure not to exclude someone because they didn’t have a requisite buzz word. ..kind of like Burger King adding a vegetarian patty to their menu so a single herbivore in a group would not 86 the idea of going to Whopperland.”

He continued, “When questioned, many booth personnel had no idea how to define IG. Some equated it with data management, others called it eDiscovery/predictive coding, still others said it was defensible disposition, and a final group said The Dead Man in Yossarian’s Tent could answer my question, if I would just return later. This was disappointing and dismaying, but it speaks to the noted (if misunderstood) significance of IG. (To be fair, a couple vendors were on board with real IG, but they stood out as exceptions that prove the rule.).”

I’m not sure if this confusion is due to the term being relatively new, but for goodness sakes, the exhibitors could have at least taken a peek at Wikipedia. As far as I am concerned, IG may be difficult and challenging to implement, but it really isn’t that hard to understand.

Even though we are a software vendor, it does rock my boat when vendors are unable to discuss or substantiate the claims that they make. I was kind of surprised that this was so prevalent.

WDYT?

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Delete Data? Why, just use search and create data lakes! Dive In!

I just read a very well written article, entitled Information Governance v Search: The Battle Lines Are Redrawn, by Ralph Losey, who is a practicing attorney and shareholder in a national law firm with 50+ offices and over 800 lawyers where he lead’s the firm’s Electronic Discovery practice group.

It is a very interesting viewpoint, and although the article is quite long, I would suggest reading it. Mr. Losey’s premise is that information should never be deleted and should be replaced with Artificial Intelligence search. He does make a several good points, but I guess I am still stuck in the old school on topics such as records management, information governance, and search. One of the points he makes is who is to decide when data has lost its value? This is referred to as an old-school problem, as in the new world all information should be saved and data lakes created, According to Losey, “information can prove what really happened in the past and can help you to make the right decisions. With smart search, there can be great hidden value in too much information. “I do take exception to that. There is quite a bit of information that organizations keep and is actually useless. Business users still spend much of their time searching because they can’t find what they need. Although, according to Losey, search will be so ‘smart’ that, I assume, the problem inherent in search engines will go away.

Losey concludes the article by stating, “that is the new reality of Big Data. It is a hard intellectual paradigm to jump, and seems counter-intuitive. It took me a long time to get it. The new ability to save and search everything cheaply and efficiently is what is driving the explosion of Big Data services and products. As the save everything, find anything way of thinking takes over, the classification and deletion aspects of IG will naturally dissipate. The records life-cycle will transform into virtual immortality. There is no reason to classify and delete, if you can save everything and find anything at low cost. The issues simplify; they change to how to save and search, although new issues of security and privacy grow in importance.” Where I see a problem is that organizations need to plan for the impact of collecting even more information, garbage or not. Not only in terms of hardware but in terms of keeping dark data.

For Information Governance, duplication and multiple sources of truth will be present. How are you certain the information you are basing decisions on is relevant and accurate? Just trust the search engine?

Perhaps from a legal standpoint, the organization does need to be more careful on delete versus keep. But not all data or content retains value forever. I wonder too, by keeping all data, eliminating records management, and depending only on search, does it impact the results of the data mining? Does it make data mining more complex to get to the information you are seeking as you are now dealing with a tremendous data set where you don’t really know which end is up? I would tend to think so.

Anyway, a radically different perspective. He hasn’t convinced me. What about you?

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Challenges in Adopting Cloud? Will it stop you from taking the leap?

According to Microsoft we will all be using Office 365 sooner or later. Not so says KPMG. 53% of enterprise executives say that data loss and privacy, risk of intellectual property theft (50%) and the impact on their IT organization (49%) are their top three challenges in adopting cloud computing. Compared to the 2012 survey, security and data privacy are now more important to enterprises than cost efficiency.

The following graphic provides an overview of the most challenging areas enterprises face when adopting cloud-based applications and platforms as part of their business strategies.

Let me know if you are in the cloud, regardless of product. Do you still have concerns about security? Will this factor decide if you use cloud technologies or not?

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Well, there you have it – IDC’s 10 predictions for emerging technologies in 2015

Now, who didn’t know it would be cloud centered? In the article, IDC’s 10 predictions for emerging technologies in 2015, authored by Frank Gens, he refers to the ‘third platform’. Sounds rather ominous. But it isn’t. The third platform, was defined by IDC in 2007, and according to IDC is in a key phase of development. Historically, as outlined in the article there have been three waves of computing. First, the mainframes and terminals, secondly, PC’s, networking, relational databases, and client services apps.

Now it gets interesting. The third platform is our current state, built around cloud computing, social applications, big data, and mobile computing. IDC has predicted that the third platform will continue to evolve and grow for the next twenty years. This will be attributed to a community of developers and a wave of core technologies (e.g. Innovation Accelerators). These accelerators include:

  • The Internet of Things
  • Cognitive systems
  • Pervasive robotics
  • 3-D printing of all kinds
  • Natural interfaces
  • Optimized security technologies and solutions

Now to the list. Not as exciting as the accelerators:

  • Information and Communications Technology Spending
  • Wireless Data
  • Mobile Development
  • Cloud Services
  • Data and Analytics
  • Internet of Things (IoT)
  • Data Centers
  • Industry Disruption
  • IoT security

I guess we will just have to wait to see if all these predictions come true. What do you think of the ‘third platform’? Does anything on the list surprise you? I personally think the Innovation Accelerators sound pretty amazing.

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Oh, you mean government has to follow the law? What was I thinking???

Just another story that illustrates how stupid government thinks we are. Or, perhaps another story for us to illustrate how stupid government is. President Obama announced on January 12th new cyber reforms. He is calling on Congress to mandate that companies whose customer data is breached inform affected individuals within 30 days. But why don’t agencies that are hacked have to notify citizens when their data is compromised? Good question it seems.

On a more humorous note, the silence on the government’s responsibility to protect its own data became awkward, as pro-ISIS hackers allegedly leaked personal information on U.S. military members around the same time Obama was speaking.
There currently is no U.S. requirement for notifying breach victims within a certain time period. A hodgepodge of state regulations give companies varying guidance on contacting victims. Less than 30 percent of federal agencies recently surveyed notified affected individuals of high-risk breaches, the Government Accountability Office reported last year.

The Federal Agency Data Breach Notification Act, introduced by Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., in the last Congress would require, among other things, notifying individual victims within 72 hours after discovering evidence of a personal data breach.

According to Connolly, “he does not feel the administration is applying a double standard by omitting agencies from its legislative agenda.”

Need we say anymore?

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