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OneDrive for Business Climbing the Ladder to Success?

Ok, I give up. A few weeks ago, I wrote about authors, presumably subject knowledgeable, that felt obligated to inform us in a slew of articles with their predictions for 2016. Enough already! Here is another one, but does have some interesting points. The article, Cloud, Data Security Remain Top Concerns Heading into 2016, written by David Weldon for Information Management, offered some highlights from an interview with Rajiv Gupta, CEO of SkyHigh Networks.

OneDrive for Business is in fourth place in the race to be first. According to Gupta, “OneDrive for Business will surge in the rankings as companies move to the cloud with Office 365,” Gupta predicts. “Companies have already shown confidence in Microsoft’s cloud platform as a system of record for sensitive information, uploading 1.37 TB per month with 17.4% of files containing sensitive data.” Additionally he said, ““There is still a huge growth opportunity, however: 87.3% of organizations have at least 100 employees using Office 365, but 93.2% of employees still use Microsoft on-premises solutions.” Microsoft has invested over one billion dollars on in security and continues to take security very seriously as a make or break situation. And it is, if you are in fourth place.

Microsoft is moving forward with OneDrive for Business, but if we look at the statistics, even without full participation of employees, the organization is opening big gaps in security. This is very to the point since most data exposures are generated by employees. Without some logical management of the content, and practicing due diligence to protect the organization from malicious or just absent minded employees, the organization can’t reap the benefits of ‘safe’ ubiquitous access. For more information on how OneDrive for Business information can be protected, please click here.

 

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Overturning 30 Years of Legacy Processes and Mindset. “That’s the way we’ve always done it’.

I’m all for change. I see organizations who are stuck in the past and activities and processes are based on ‘well that’s the way we’ve always done it.’ And forget suggesting changes, as that won’t fly either, and you hear ‘no, it won’t work that way because…’

According to Ojas Rege, vice president of strategy at MobileIron, in an article wrote, “Indeed, 2016 will be a challenging year for IT as mobile and cloud force CIOs to adopt a more agile model of information security, policy design, technology evaluation, and lifecycle management, This new approach overturns 30 years of legacy process and mindset but it can no longer be avoided. As a result, 2016 will be the first year of true transformation.” I think my jaw dropped about 10 inches when I read that. I don’t understand how 30 years of legacy process and mindset can be changed in one year. Think of it, this includes the organizational structure, culture, and all current processes. It’s not that I disagree with what he is saying, it’s only the time-frame.

The key to accomplish what Rege wants is to put technology behind the transformation. People are difficult to change, not even considering the 30 years of doing business the same way. The less impact on the staff the easier it is to accomplish the objective. To this, you need to turn to technology. For example, our technologies eliminate end user tagging by automatically generating conceptual metadata. Considering that 93% of organizations still use manual tagging that would be a radical technology change, but easy to swallow as it makes the end users job easier, and the company incurs less errors.

Talk about agile. Is your organization changing your current information model? What was the impetus? Will this happen in a year?

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