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Delete Data? Why, just use search and create data lakes! Dive In!

I just read a very well written article, entitled Information Governance v Search: The Battle Lines Are Redrawn, by Ralph Losey, who is a practicing attorney and shareholder in a national law firm with 50+ offices and over 800 lawyers where he lead’s the firm’s Electronic Discovery practice group.

It is a very interesting viewpoint, and although the article is quite long, I would suggest reading it. Mr. Losey’s premise is that information should never be deleted and should be replaced with Artificial Intelligence search. He does make a several good points, but I guess I am still stuck in the old school on topics such as records management, information governance, and search. One of the points he makes is who is to decide when data has lost its value? This is referred to as an old-school problem, as in the new world all information should be saved and data lakes created, According to Losey, “information can prove what really happened in the past and can help you to make the right decisions. With smart search, there can be great hidden value in too much information. “I do take exception to that. There is quite a bit of information that organizations keep and is actually useless. Business users still spend much of their time searching because they can’t find what they need. Although, according to Losey, search will be so ‘smart’ that, I assume, the problem inherent in search engines will go away.

Losey concludes the article by stating, “that is the new reality of Big Data. It is a hard intellectual paradigm to jump, and seems counter-intuitive. It took me a long time to get it. The new ability to save and search everything cheaply and efficiently is what is driving the explosion of Big Data services and products. As the save everything, find anything way of thinking takes over, the classification and deletion aspects of IG will naturally dissipate. The records life-cycle will transform into virtual immortality. There is no reason to classify and delete, if you can save everything and find anything at low cost. The issues simplify; they change to how to save and search, although new issues of security and privacy grow in importance.” Where I see a problem is that organizations need to plan for the impact of collecting even more information, garbage or not. Not only in terms of hardware but in terms of keeping dark data.

For Information Governance, duplication and multiple sources of truth will be present. How are you certain the information you are basing decisions on is relevant and accurate? Just trust the search engine?

Perhaps from a legal standpoint, the organization does need to be more careful on delete versus keep. But not all data or content retains value forever. I wonder too, by keeping all data, eliminating records management, and depending only on search, does it impact the results of the data mining? Does it make data mining more complex to get to the information you are seeking as you are now dealing with a tremendous data set where you don’t really know which end is up? I would tend to think so.

Anyway, a radically different perspective. He hasn’t convinced me. What about you?

(If you have a few minutes and use SharePoint or Office 365, could you kindly take our metadata survey? You could win a free conference pass to Microsoft Ignite. We would greatly appreciate it)

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Well, there you have it – IDC’s 10 predictions for emerging technologies in 2015

Now, who didn’t know it would be cloud centered? In the article, IDC’s 10 predictions for emerging technologies in 2015, authored by Frank Gens, he refers to the ‘third platform’. Sounds rather ominous. But it isn’t. The third platform, was defined by IDC in 2007, and according to IDC is in a key phase of development. Historically, as outlined in the article there have been three waves of computing. First, the mainframes and terminals, secondly, PC’s, networking, relational databases, and client services apps.

Now it gets interesting. The third platform is our current state, built around cloud computing, social applications, big data, and mobile computing. IDC has predicted that the third platform will continue to evolve and grow for the next twenty years. This will be attributed to a community of developers and a wave of core technologies (e.g. Innovation Accelerators). These accelerators include:

  • The Internet of Things
  • Cognitive systems
  • Pervasive robotics
  • 3-D printing of all kinds
  • Natural interfaces
  • Optimized security technologies and solutions

Now to the list. Not as exciting as the accelerators:

  • Information and Communications Technology Spending
  • Wireless Data
  • Mobile Development
  • Cloud Services
  • Data and Analytics
  • Internet of Things (IoT)
  • Data Centers
  • Industry Disruption
  • IoT security

I guess we will just have to wait to see if all these predictions come true. What do you think of the ‘third platform’? Does anything on the list surprise you? I personally think the Innovation Accelerators sound pretty amazing.

(If you have a few minutes and use SharePoint or Office 365, could you kindly take our metadata survey? You could win a free conference pass to Microsoft Ignite. We would greatly appreciate it)

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Social Media Analytics – A spider web out of control?

I read an article ‘Social Intelligence: The New Frontier for Business Intelligence’ which I found interesting. In it, the author, Mark Perrett, Worldwide Social Intelligence Solution Development Leader for HP Enterprise, proposed that social intelligence will become a new frontier under the ever growing umbrella of data analytics. The author defined this term as “social intelligence provides deeper knowledge of customers by combining insights into customers’ social media behavior with traditional customer intelligence gleaned from conventional marketing and customer relationship management.” I’m not sure I would call this a new frontier although I do agree that the majority of companies are not addressing this as a business priority with everything else on their plates.

The question posed in my mind was a statement he made that “In many organizations, senior leaders are turning to their IT departments to get control of the volume of data and turn it into actionable insights. To help their organizations achieve their goals, IT teams need to learn how to aggregate, analyze and act upon insights found in social media streams.” I would fundamentally disagree with this statement. As a technical marketing person for too many years to count, although IT may need to set-up the technical framework, (the author views this process as a combination of traditional CRM, marketing, and social media communications), the analysis and determination of objectives and subsequent achievement of objectives would not be the responsibility of IT, it would be the ‘business group’. At least that has been the case in any marketing job I have ever held.

It is similar to a spider web where each spider silk is intertwined with the spider web itself holding it together. Regardless if it’s social intelligence, text analytics, Big Data, who is responsible in your organization or who would be responsible for identifying the ‘actionable insights’? The data ‘gatherer’ or the business owner? Do you think this should fall on IT?

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